Wednesday, September 10, 2014
The last few days of football has given the School the appearance of an emergency hospital. Nobody’s Business, October 8, 1902 (SC’s student newspaper)
Sunday, September 7, 2014
Last week we alluded to the fervor which that acme of manly sports, football, had wrought among our men. This week it is with much satisfaction that we record the fact that during the last six days no bones have been broken, no tendons have been torn—there has been no call for either the surgeon or the ambulance. Nobody’s Business, November 8, 1904
Thursday, September 4, 2014
Of course at this season of the year the chief subject of interest is football. We have had football for breakfast, football for dinner, and football for supper. During our waking moments the chief topic for conversation has been football, and when we have lain down to rest our dreams have been occupied with this all absorbing theme. Football! Football! Football! Well, perhaps this is as it ought to be: when you do a thing, throw yourself into it, body and soul—do it with your might.

Nobody’s Business (SC’s Student Newspaper), October 31, 1904

It’s football season! Here’s to hoping your fantasy draft picks carry you to victory. 

Monday, September 1, 2014
Today on Mustache Monday, we bring you Edgar M. Robinson
Robinson graduated from SC in 1901 and became a faculty member at his alma mater. In a career spanning more than forty years, Robinson devoted his professional life to the development of boys’ work, outdoor life, camping and physical education. Robinson worked for the YMCA serving as Boy’s Work Secretary on local, national, and international levels both at home and abroad. In 1910, Robinson also served as the first Organizing Secretary of the Boy Scouts of America with friend and co-worker, Ernest Thompson Seton, who was then Chief Scout of the Boy Scouts of America. Robinson joined the faculty of Springfield College almost thirty years after graduation and served as the Honorary Director of Boys Work Courses and the Advisor in Methods and Principles in Work with Boys at Springfield College from 1927-1937. As a faculty member, Edgar Robinson was actively involved in the construction of the “Pueblo of the Seven Fires”, a permanent camp structure completed in 1933 on the Springfield College East Campus, and with the establishment of the Freshman Camp, a “field science and camping class” traditionally held each Spring in the Pueblo. As a researcher and writer, Robinson chronicled the early histories of the YMCA and the Boy Scouts of America, as well as, penning “Ernest Thompson Seton: an unforgettable personality” after Seton’s death in 1946. Edgar Munroe Robinson died in Springfield on April 9, 1951.

Today on Mustache Monday, we bring you Edgar M. Robinson

Robinson graduated from SC in 1901 and became a faculty member at his alma mater. In a career spanning more than forty years, Robinson devoted his professional life to the development of boys’ work, outdoor life, camping and physical education. Robinson worked for the YMCA serving as Boy’s Work Secretary on local, national, and international levels both at home and abroad. In 1910, Robinson also served as the first Organizing Secretary of the Boy Scouts of America with friend and co-worker, Ernest Thompson Seton, who was then Chief Scout of the Boy Scouts of America. Robinson joined the faculty of Springfield College almost thirty years after graduation and served as the Honorary Director of Boys Work Courses and the Advisor in Methods and Principles in Work with Boys at Springfield College from 1927-1937. As a faculty member, Edgar Robinson was actively involved in the construction of the “Pueblo of the Seven Fires”, a permanent camp structure completed in 1933 on the Springfield College East Campus, and with the establishment of the Freshman Camp, a “field science and camping class” traditionally held each Spring in the Pueblo. As a researcher and writer, Robinson chronicled the early histories of the YMCA and the Boy Scouts of America, as well as, penning “Ernest Thompson Seton: an unforgettable personality” after Seton’s death in 1946. Edgar Munroe Robinson died in Springfield on April 9, 1951.

Thursday, August 28, 2014
These murals, along with several others, can be found on the walls of Springfield College’s Pueblo of the Seven Fires. They were painted by artist Wo Peen in 1932. Peen, also known as Luis Gonzalez, was a famous Native American artist known for his traditional murals and paintings.
The Pueblo of the Seven Fires is the name of the main building located on Springfield College’s East Campus. The building, the only authentic southwestern pueblo structure east of the Mississippi, was dedicated in 1932. The interior of the Pueblo features seven fireplaces, including a large fireplace donated by 4-H clubs. The seven fires refer to the seven fires of youth: self-expression, universality, ruggedness, regret/humility, truth, comradeship and beauty.
Today the Pueblo is still used as it was originally designed, as a student learning facility hosting classes, camp groups and acting as a special function hall.

These murals, along with several others, can be found on the walls of Springfield College’s Pueblo of the Seven Fires. They were painted by artist Wo Peen in 1932. Peen, also known as Luis Gonzalez, was a famous Native American artist known for his traditional murals and paintings.

The Pueblo of the Seven Fires is the name of the main building located on Springfield College’s East Campus. The building, the only authentic southwestern pueblo structure east of the Mississippi, was dedicated in 1932. The interior of the Pueblo features seven fireplaces, including a large fireplace donated by 4-H clubs. The seven fires refer to the seven fires of youth: self-expression, universality, ruggedness, regret/humility, truth, comradeship and beauty.

Today the Pueblo is still used as it was originally designed, as a student learning facility hosting classes, camp groups and acting as a special function hall.

Monday, August 25, 2014
Mustache Monday with the one, the only, Dr. James Naismith
James A. Naismith (November 6, 1861 – November 28, 1939) is known as “The Father of Basketball” and was born in Almonte, Ontario. When he was nine, both of his parents died of typhoid fever and he was raised by his uncle, who later financed Naismith’s way through college. He earned his theological degree from McGill University and graduated from Springfield College, then the YMCA Training School, in 1891. After graduation, he was hired as a faculty member, where he taught for five years. It is in his first year as a faculty member at Springfield College that he created the game of Basketball as an activity for an unruly class. In 1895, Naismith enrolled at the Gross Medical School in Denver and received his M.D. in 1898. In that same year, Naismith took the position of department head of physical education at the University of Kansas, where he remained until his death.

Mustache Monday with the one, the only, Dr. James Naismith

James A. Naismith (November 6, 1861 – November 28, 1939) is known as “The Father of Basketball” and was born in Almonte, Ontario. When he was nine, both of his parents died of typhoid fever and he was raised by his uncle, who later financed Naismith’s way through college. He earned his theological degree from McGill University and graduated from Springfield College, then the YMCA Training School, in 1891. After graduation, he was hired as a faculty member, where he taught for five years. It is in his first year as a faculty member at Springfield College that he created the game of Basketball as an activity for an unruly class. In 1895, Naismith enrolled at the Gross Medical School in Denver and received his M.D. in 1898. In that same year, Naismith took the position of department head of physical education at the University of Kansas, where he remained until his death.

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Behold, Captain James Chiosso’s Gymnastic Polymachinon

It’s basically the Bowflex of the 19th century. You can do curls, squats, chest work, leg extensions, head bobs (see image) and much, much more! 

Captain Chiosso worked as a gymnastics professor at the University College School in London. He built his first weightlifting device sometime between 1829 and 1831. Over the next several decades he refined the machine, enclosing the weights and pulleys and designing interior compartments for smoother movement.

Carolyn Thomas de la Pena wrote in The Body Electric: How Strange Machines Built the Modern American: “Long an advocate of traditional gymnastics, Chiosso had been searching for a way to bring healthful exercise to individuals who were intimidated by organized fitness or who were without access to public facilities. He believed the solution lay in bringing a gymnastics routine to people who would not come to it.”

According to Jan Todd’s Physical Culture and the Body Beautiful: “Chiosso considered his machine ‘elegant and ornamental’ and suitable for prominent display in the dining room, library, or boudoir of anyone’s home. To check their progress, and to see how they compared to their neighbors, people could try the strength testing machines that appeared on many street corners and at fairs.’”

Tuesday, August 19, 2014
The meanest job I ever undertook,” mused a Colorado man, “was that of apologizing to a widow, on behalf of a Vigilance Committee, which hanged her husband by mistake. It was hard to find just the excuse that would satisfy her.

Nobody’s Business (November 11, 1899)

Another context-less gem from Springfield College’s first student newspaper

Monday, August 18, 2014
#19 takes center stage for today’s Mustache Monday
Three Springfield College alumni from the class of 1900 (left to right): Walter W. Saunders, Clifford T. Booth, and William H. Bennett. The significance of the numbers on their shoes is unknown.

#19 takes center stage for today’s Mustache Monday

Three Springfield College alumni from the class of 1900 (left to right): Walter W. Saunders, Clifford T. Booth, and William H. Bennett. The significance of the numbers on their shoes is unknown.

Thursday, August 14, 2014
A newspaper article, titled “Drowning Cat Gave World Basketball" by A.P. D’Ambra, details an interesting take on the creation of basketball. According to the author, when Dr. James Naismith was a young boy, he tossed a cat into a bucket of water. He noticed the perfect arc and flight of the tossed cat and that gave him the idea of basketball.
The second part of the article discusses Naismith and the game of basketball. It explains how the game of basketball has evolved and how it has spread all over the world. Naismith (November 6, 1861 – November 28, 1939), known as “The Father of Basketball,” was born in Almonte, Ontario. He earned his theological degree from McGill University and graduated from Springfield College, then the YMCA Training School, in 1891.
After graduation, he was hired as a faculty member at Springfield, where he taught for five years. It was in his first year as a faculty member at Springfield College that he created the game of basketball as an activity for an unruly class.

A newspaper article, titled “Drowning Cat Gave World Basketball" by A.P. D’Ambra, details an interesting take on the creation of basketball. According to the author, when Dr. James Naismith was a young boy, he tossed a cat into a bucket of water. He noticed the perfect arc and flight of the tossed cat and that gave him the idea of basketball.

The second part of the article discusses Naismith and the game of basketball. It explains how the game of basketball has evolved and how it has spread all over the world. Naismith (November 6, 1861 – November 28, 1939), known as “The Father of Basketball,” was born in Almonte, Ontario. He earned his theological degree from McGill University and graduated from Springfield College, then the YMCA Training School, in 1891.

After graduation, he was hired as a faculty member at Springfield, where he taught for five years. It was in his first year as a faculty member at Springfield College that he created the game of basketball as an activity for an unruly class.