Tuesday, September 30, 2014
I have been following the American-German situation with a great deal of interest. At times it looks as though it should only be a matter of days until a declaration of war is announced.

-Duncan Mac Rae. February 23, 1917

The United States officially declared war on Germany April 6, 1917.

Sunday, September 28, 2014
Before Humanics in Action Day existed, Springfield College had another strong community out reach tradition known as Work Week.
In 1969, Art Linkletter, a famous radio and television personality who also served as a trustee for Springfield College for many years,joined in on the action.
During Work Week students volunteered their time to help Springfield’s community. The 1969, work week was much different, as students, led by Linkletter, hired themselves out to local businesses in order to give their services to who ever needed them.
Although Linkletter never raced cars or worked in the pits, his tire changing form looks exceptional.

Before Humanics in Action Day existed, Springfield College had another strong community out reach tradition known as Work Week.

In 1969, Art Linkletter, a famous radio and television personality who also served as a trustee for Springfield College for many years,joined in on the action.

During Work Week students volunteered their time to help Springfield’s community. The 1969, work week was much different, as students, led by Linkletter, hired themselves out to local businesses in order to give their services to who ever needed them.

Although Linkletter never raced cars or worked in the pits, his tire changing form looks exceptional.

Thursday, September 25, 2014
Throwback Thursday
Behold the Beveridge Center! Once known as the Union at Springfield College, the Beveridge Center was home to many student activities since its inception in 1958.
Conference rooms, the student newspaper and radio station and the yearbook offices were all located within the Beveridge Center (BC). However, in 2008 the BC was renovated and is now part of the Richard B. Flynn Campus Union on the Springfield College Campus.

Throwback Thursday

Behold the Beveridge Center! Once known as the Union at Springfield College, the Beveridge Center was home to many student activities since its inception in 1958.

Conference rooms, the student newspaper and radio station and the yearbook offices were all located within the Beveridge Center (BC). However, in 2008 the BC was renovated and is now part of the Richard B. Flynn Campus Union on the Springfield College Campus.

Tuesday, September 23, 2014
Students and Faculty work together in the first ever Humanics in Action Day on Sept. 10, 1998!
Started by New Student Orientation Leaders and Professor of Humanics Peter Polito, Humanics in Action Day was and continues to be a way for Springfield College to give back and help it’s neighbors/surrounding community.

Students and Faculty work together in the first ever Humanics in Action Day on Sept. 10, 1998!

Started by New Student Orientation Leaders and Professor of Humanics Peter Polito, Humanics in Action Day was and continues to be a way for Springfield College to give back and help it’s neighbors/surrounding community.

And so the tradition lives on.
Humanics in Action Day began on September 10, 1998, when students, staff, faculty and administration from Springfield College joined with the Springfield community to work on a variety of service projects. The seven projects undertaken covered a wide array of areas, including reading to children, designing local community projects, painting murals, cleaning playgrounds, building picnic tables and volunteering at local clinics. Two scenes are depicted above. 
Humanics in Action Day is the modern version of early Springfield College student outreach traditions. It was co-developed by the student leaders of the New Student Orientation Executive Board and Peter J. Polito, Dale Allen, Michael Liberty and Gretchen Brockmeyer. Polito (pictured in the sketch) used it as part of his work as the Distinguished Professor of Humanics for 1998-1999.
Humanics in Action ultimately unites Springfield College and its surrounding neighborhoods to work on community service projects.

And so the tradition lives on.

Humanics in Action Day began on September 10, 1998, when students, staff, faculty and administration from Springfield College joined with the Springfield community to work on a variety of service projects. The seven projects undertaken covered a wide array of areas, including reading to children, designing local community projects, painting murals, cleaning playgrounds, building picnic tables and volunteering at local clinics. Two scenes are depicted above. 

Humanics in Action Day is the modern version of early Springfield College student outreach traditions. It was co-developed by the student leaders of the New Student Orientation Executive Board and Peter J. Polito, Dale Allen, Michael Liberty and Gretchen Brockmeyer. Polito (pictured in the sketch) used it as part of his work as the Distinguished Professor of Humanics for 1998-1999.

Humanics in Action ultimately unites Springfield College and its surrounding neighborhoods to work on community service projects.

Thursday, September 18, 2014
Are you tired of traditional sports? Perhaps looking for a new game to play with your friends? How about trying out cage ball?
This photograph shows Springfield College students playing cage ball, an annual game played on a football field that involves two teams of 25 players pushing a gigantic ball across their opponent’s goal. A team receives one point if the ball crosses the end line, two points if the ball is pushed entirely under the goal post, and three points if the ball is pushed entirely over the goal post. The game consists of two 20-minute halves and one 10-minute break, and was traditionally played between classes (i.e. freshmen vs. sophomores).
Contemporary cage balls have an internal rubber bladder to contain the air. The outside is sometimes vinyl, though for many years the covering was only made of canvas. Although spherical, the cage ball shares the American football’s laces, which holds in the bladder.

Are you tired of traditional sports? Perhaps looking for a new game to play with your friends? How about trying out cage ball?

This photograph shows Springfield College students playing cage ball, an annual game played on a football field that involves two teams of 25 players pushing a gigantic ball across their opponent’s goal. A team receives one point if the ball crosses the end line, two points if the ball is pushed entirely under the goal post, and three points if the ball is pushed entirely over the goal post. The game consists of two 20-minute halves and one 10-minute break, and was traditionally played between classes (i.e. freshmen vs. sophomores).

Contemporary cage balls have an internal rubber bladder to contain the air. The outside is sometimes vinyl, though for many years the covering was only made of canvas. Although spherical, the cage ball shares the American football’s laces, which holds in the bladder.

Monday, September 15, 2014
Not many Springfield College football players go on to get drafted and play in the NFL. John Curtis did, however, going in the eleventh round of the 1971 NFL Draft to the New York Jets. In Curtis’ senior year, the Springfield College football team finished the season with six wins and three losses under head coach Ted Dunn.
Curtis was elected into the Springfield College Athletics Hall of Fame in 1992. In a football packet paying tribute to the program from the years 1890-2010, Curtis was labeled as “inarguably the greatest wide receiver to ever play at Springfield College.”
Curtis was the first Springfield wide receiver to amass over 1,000 yards in a single season, and the first to do so in the New England college circle. As of 2010, he was the sole holder or tied for every major statistical record for receiving in the team’s history (nine total records).

Not many Springfield College football players go on to get drafted and play in the NFL. John Curtis did, however, going in the eleventh round of the 1971 NFL Draft to the New York Jets. In Curtis’ senior year, the Springfield College football team finished the season with six wins and three losses under head coach Ted Dunn.

Curtis was elected into the Springfield College Athletics Hall of Fame in 1992. In a football packet paying tribute to the program from the years 1890-2010, Curtis was labeled as “inarguably the greatest wide receiver to ever play at Springfield College.”

Curtis was the first Springfield wide receiver to amass over 1,000 yards in a single season, and the first to do so in the New England college circle. As of 2010, he was the sole holder or tied for every major statistical record for receiving in the team’s history (nine total records).

Wednesday, September 10, 2014
The last few days of football has given the School the appearance of an emergency hospital. Nobody’s Business, October 8, 1902 (SC’s student newspaper)
Sunday, September 7, 2014
Last week we alluded to the fervor which that acme of manly sports, football, had wrought among our men. This week it is with much satisfaction that we record the fact that during the last six days no bones have been broken, no tendons have been torn—there has been no call for either the surgeon or the ambulance. Nobody’s Business, November 8, 1904
Thursday, September 4, 2014
Of course at this season of the year the chief subject of interest is football. We have had football for breakfast, football for dinner, and football for supper. During our waking moments the chief topic for conversation has been football, and when we have lain down to rest our dreams have been occupied with this all absorbing theme. Football! Football! Football! Well, perhaps this is as it ought to be: when you do a thing, throw yourself into it, body and soul—do it with your might.

Nobody’s Business (SC’s Student Newspaper), October 31, 1904

It’s football season! Here’s to hoping your fantasy draft picks carry you to victory.